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The New Significance » Entries tagged with "Education"

Carlos Delclós: The Neoliberal Assault On University Education

Carlos Delclós: The Neoliberal Assault On University Education

By Carlos Delclós While global elites continue their cynical assault on higher education unabated, the global student movement shows us that another world is possible.   It is often said that we live in a post-industrial society, where knowledge and innovation are the motors of production and information is the currency. We are also told, in the midst of a deepening systemic crisis, that the drastic measures taken by our governments, painful as they may be, are necessary … Read entire article »

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Scott McLemee: Education Is In The Streets

Scott McLemee: Education Is In The Streets

By Scott McLemee When students took to the streets in Rome last November to demonstrate against proposed budget cuts to the university system, they introduced something new to the vocabulary of protest. To defend themselves from police truncheons they carried improvised shields made of polystyrene, painted, on the front, with the names of classic works of literature and philosophy: Moby Dick, The Republic, Don Quixote, A Thousand Plateaus…. The practice caught on. A couple of weeks later, … Read entire article »

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Noam Chomsky: Education Q&A

Noam Chomsky: Education Q&A

By Noam Chomsky: Source: The Charlatan Interviewed by Jennifer Pagliaro, in The Charlatan (Carleton University). June 4, 2011. The Charlatan: I saw that you were quoted as saying “education is ignorance” – Noam Chomsky: Well, that’s what it often is in practice. It shouldn’t be. TC: I’m just wondering if you can speak to this idea of education being mostly something that teaches obedience rather than critical thinking. NC: I didn’t say that’s what it mostly is. I said that’s what … Read entire article »

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Chilean Students Kiss Protest

Chilean Students Kiss Protest

Thousands of Chilean students lock lips to demand education reforms in ongoing clashes with the government. (video) Protests punish Pinera, but Chile economy seen safe By Alexandra Ulmer and Alexis Krell SANTIAGO | Thu Jul 7, 2011 3:57pm EDT (Reuters) – A growing wave of protests against Chilean President Sebastian Pinera’s policies risks hampering his legislative agenda though investment in Latin America’s model economy is seen safe for now. Led by students demanding cheaper and better state education, hundreds of thousands of people have taken … Read entire article »

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Nina Power: Against Education Cuts

Nina Power: Against Education Cuts

By Nina Power: Before the UK election in May 2010, Conservative think-tanks such as Policy Exchange were suggesting that universities should be forced to ‘sink or swim’ and that private takeover was a very real possibility for ‘failing’ (or even not-so-failing) universities. While the introduction of ‘top-up’ tuition fees in 1998 heralded a shift in the way institutions understood their relation to both the state and their students, the total market vision of universities held by the … Read entire article »

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Cristian Cabalin: Students March For A Better Chile

Cristian Cabalin: Students March For A Better Chile

By Cristian Cabalin: Chile’s education system both reflects and perpetuates the inequality of its society. These protests hope to reform both. Chile’s Sebastián Piñera government is facing hard times. In addition tocitizen disapproval rates currently standing at 56%, he now has to contend with massive student protests of a scale not seen in Chile since the return of democracy in 1990. The latest large-scale protest brought together hundreds of thousands of people across the country, demanding better public … Read entire article »

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Terry Eagleton: AC Grayling’s Private University Is Odious

Terry Eagleton: AC Grayling’s Private University Is Odious

By Terry Eagleton: The money-grubbing dons signing up at the £18k a year New College of the Humanities are the thin edge of an ugly wedge. A group of well-known academics are setting up a private college in London which will charge students £18,000 a year in tuition fees. There will, as usual, be scholarships for the deserving poor. As a kind of Oxbridge by the Thames, the New College of the Humanities will offer students weekly one-on-one … Read entire article »

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Pablo K: The New School for Privatised Inquiry

Pablo K: The New School for Privatised Inquiry

By Pablo K: In 1919, John Dewey and others founded The New School for Social Research, intended to offer a democratic and general education for those excluded by existing structures. On the faculty side, this meant a staunch defence of academic freedom in the face of increasing censorship and a climate of intellectual fear. For students, it meant evening classes, an open structure of instruction and the ability to engage in inquiry despite exclusion from the … Read entire article »

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Franco “Bifo” Berardi: After The End Of The University

Franco “Bifo” Berardi: After The End Of The University

By Franco “Bifo” Berardi: In 1931 Mussolini asked the Italian academics to swear allegiance to the Fascist regime. Only a dozen of them – out of 1600 – refused to subdue. The best minds were already abroad: Piero Sraffa was teaching in Cambridge as an exile, and scholars like Enrico Fermi who were working on the most advanced frontiers of physics were already in the US. Something similar is happening today in this country where twice in … Read entire article »

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The Importance of Research in a University

The Importance of Research in a University

By Mahmood Mamdani “But this challenge to autonomous scholarship is not unprecedented—indeed, autonomous scholarship was also denigrated in the early post-colonial state, when universities were conceived of as providing the “manpower” necessary for national development, and original knowledge production was seen as a luxury.” My remarks will be more critical than congratulatory. I will focus more on the challenge we face rather than the progress we have made. My focus will also be limited, to the Humanities … Read entire article »

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